ramblings of an immigrant son

Archive for September, 2011|Monthly archive page

Why Making Reading A Part of Your Life is One of the Best Decisions You Can Make for Yourself

In Activism, Books, Culture, Globalization, Lifestyle, Opinions, Science, Society on September 29, 2011 at 1:45 pm

Although reading is widely recognized as a respectable hobby, the negative connotation of being a ‘bookworm’ lives on. Sure it is considered cool for adolescents to like to read popular fiction such as the Harry Potter series. It is even true that enjoying the occasional New York Times Best Seller is considered chic, and an essential part of bourgeois-pseudo-intellectual-Starbuck culture. However, when an individual’s passion for reading goes beyond superficial interest, it is not always well looked upon.

One charge is that reading too much undermines physical activity and encourages laziness. If you choose to spend long hours reading on a sofa instead of playing sports or working out, you might eventually find yourself needing to shave more than just a few pounds. Moreover, there is the view that beside being a form of entertainment, fictional books are not especially useful in the real world. While some dismiss it as being recreation, others, more harshly, regard it as a waste of time. Lastly, and perhaps the most persuasive of all, is the accusation that too much reading, like playing too much computer games, isn’t good for you. If you favour literature over interacting with other human beings, pursuing life goals, and becoming involved in day-to-day life, reading can become a form of escapism from reality. Rather than motivating personal development, it will serve to impede it.

Ironically, the logical extreme of these concerns is perhaps best represented in the main character of the modern classic, A Confederacy of Dunces. Ignatius J. Reilly, an obese penniless former graduate student, is obsessed with medieval literature to the point of harbouring a warped perception of himself and the world around him. More in touch with the writings of the Roman philosopher Boethius than his mother’s emotional and financial woes, Reilly’s bookish knowledge seems encourage his laziness, indifference, and reckless behaviour.

Maybe there are justifiable grounds for believing that there is such a thing as reading too much. However, I believe that for the vast majority of book lovers, reading is not only a healthy activity, but a pursuit that furthers personal growth and social awareness. There are good reasons for taking this stance.

For one thing, the view that excessive reading can lead to an unhealthy lifestyle rings hollow when one considers the amount of time people spend doing other more harmful indoor activities such as watching television. If anything, with the vast amount of up-to-date and self-help literature available, books are able to alert us about why regular consumption of fast-food and being a couch potato is so harmful to human health. In developed countries especially, books make it possible for almost anyone to gain an in-depth understanding of health issues in such a way that word-to-mouth, or even fast-pace-minute-by-minute media sources, simply can’t. How people choose to live with this easy-to-access information though is a different matter. After all, if you enjoy reading books but regularly sit or lie down for hours, chances are you probably have bigger problems than an addiction to ink on paper.

The novelist-activist Alice Walker once remarked “[i]f a book doesn’t make us better, then what on earth is it for?’’ Although she eloquently pointed out that the reading experience is relevant, she overlooked the fact that there is no way to know for sure whether one tale or the next will impact you positively or not. No matter how famous or popular a particular work is, it’s impossible to know if you will relate to it until you take the time to read it. Even then, you can’t be sure that it will be relevant to your existence today, tomorrow, next year, decades later, or perhaps ever! As most dedicated readers soon realize though, when one strikes gold, a story has the power to fill them with limitless inspiration, compassion, hope, courage, and determination. Literature, regardless of genre, has the potential to profoundly influence a person to make constructive changes to their lives and way of thinking. Making reading a regular part of life then, contrary to being a useless pastime, is if anything, a very worthwhile time investment.

If one is skeptical of opinion-based explanations for why a passion for reading is healthy, he or she may soon find themselves confronted by scientific proof. In “Why Fiction is Good for You,” the Globe and Mail considers a cognitive psychologist’s belief that  plays, stories, poems, and novels produce mental models in which readers can experiment with ideas about themselves and others. Describing preliminary psychological studies that support his hypothesis, the article proceeds to elaborate on the possibility that reading and talking about fictional works can powerfully shape our personalities. Comparing the reading experience to the use of a flight simulator, the psychologist explains how reading books and participating in book clubs enables people to open their minds to new ideas, perspectives, and possibilities within a ‘safe place.’

The implications of such research findings are significant. The studies would strengthen the view that fiction and non-fiction make it possible for hundreds of millions of human beings to access as well as share complex ideas, facts, worldviews, memories, and experiences from the comfort of their libraries, homes, and portable devices. Also, they would provide empirical evidence that books indeed have a vital role to play in enabling people to become informed and socially active like never before. Perhaps then, the title of bookworm would take on a entirely new meaning. One certainly can hope anyway!

For those interested in reading the Globe and Mail news report:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/books/why-fiction-is-good-for-you/article2159339/

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Let Personal Experience and Critical Thinking be Your Guide

In Buddhism, Culture, Globalization, Huxley, Lifestyle, morality, Nietzsche, Opinions, Philosophy, Religion, society on September 1, 2011 at 5:31 am

Are you a vegetarian that finds yourself in awkward situations where, for instance, at a friend’s barbeque night, the tofu dogs are mixed with the beef patties? Are you a Left-a-Saurus that reads Naomi Klein and Noam Chomsky by day, but hits that generic Irish-looking pub with the ever-glowing big-screens, ample supply of big-corporate brand beer, and service of over-worked-under-paid waitresses by night? Are you a regular church or temple goer that finds your personal opinions are becoming heavily influenced by non-believers? Are you friends with someone whose sexuality, ethnicity, or belief system isn’t considered ‘right’ according to the values of your family or community?

For those of us that are committed to some personal belief or practice, we’ve all found ourselves in situations very much similar to these. Although at times they can be humorous and trivial, in other instances they can be unsettling and life changing. How are we suppose to deal with challenges to our way of thinking and living when they arise?

Well, the way I see it, there are three options:

Option 1: If a belief or practice is no longer meaningful to you, discard or replace it. When giving up a belief or practice that you truly felt committed to, there is of course the implication of hypocrisy to consider. However, as the author of Brave New World, A. Huxley, aptly warns elsewhere, “too much consistency is as bad for the mind as it is for the body. Consistency is contrary to nature, contrary to life. The only completely consistent people are the dead.” This point of view, by no means a new one, is eloquently encouraged in the verses of the Tao Te Ching:

When people are born they are gentle and soft.

At death they are hard and stiff.

When plants are alive they are soft and delicate.

When they die, they wither and dry up.

Therefore the hard and stiff are followers of death.

The gentle and soft are the followers of life

From this point of view, changing opinions, lifestyle choices, and even group loyalties that no longer satisfy you is quite normal and healthy. Confining yourself to a particular ideology or cause can become counterproductive to personal growth, and in more serious cases, even threaten your very wellbeing.

Option 2: Fight for who you want to be. As F. N. Nietzsche outlines in his work Beyond Good and Evil though, it all too easy to conform to social and political pressures that seeps into our lives and very difficult to be a person with a mind of his or her own. This is especially true in a day and age where most human beings live in densely populated societies that are increasingly becoming culturally homogenized on a global scale. Living in a technological “flat” world doesn’t even begin to describe it. For example, what teenagers typically prefer to eat, drink, read, play, buy, listen to, and watch in Yunlin Taiwan isn’t all that different from what youths generally like in Alberta Canada.  Living during a time of unprecedented economic, social, and political integration himself, Nietzsche was aware of how difficult it can be for one to deviate from family, community, and societal expectations. He knew only too well what was at stake. As he admits elsewhere, “[t]he individual has always to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened.” Nevertheless, he confidently adds “no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.”

Option 3: Let personal experience and critical thinking be your guide. As the musician-poet Bob Dylan simply put it, “all I can do is be me, whoever that is.” Those that sincerely strive to live by certain principles, know that upholding beliefs and practices is a lifelong work-in-progress. Sooner or later, they discover that attempting to force conviction that isn’t there can be just as disastrous in consequence as hastily swinging from one way of thinking or acting to another. They risk not only hurting themselves, but those they care for as well as the very world they live in. So, when, more often than not, you are not sure whether to pursue option one or option two, take option three.

Here are four pointers on how to do so:

  • Prioritize what you personally want and need first. At first glance, this may seem like an awfully selfish thing to do. However, when you try to appease those you love, be they family, friends, or community by adopting ideologies and activities that you do not believe in, there is a huge risk that they may erode your happiness. If this happens, you will not only come to resent them, but the very people that sincerely embrace them. So rather than allow yourself to get suffocated by ideas and practices that aren’t your own, do everyone a favour and prioritize being truthful to yourself.
  • If your conduct becomes at odds with your beliefs, it doesn’t necessarily mean you need to throw in the towel. No matter what ideal you pursue, do bear in mind that you are only human. We all say or do certain things that we later wish that we had not. A lapse in faith or conviction does not need to inevitably result in a permanent situation. Admittedly, real world events, unforeseeable incidents, and dramatic changes in health can have an powerful influence upon our lives. Nonetheless, if you are able to read this blog post, then you most likely can think for yourself. So if you let yourself down for whatever reason, don’t lose heart. It is ultimately in your power to decide just how life’s various surprises can impact your thoughts and actions in the present.
  •  Don’t just take someone else’s word for it. As Buddha insisted to his disciples, they should trust their own personal experience and not just accept his teachings, or any other, at face value. In my humble opinion, truer words have been scarcely spoken. No matter whether it is an ancient scripture, popular belief, or a life-long held custom, it should have a unique meaning for you. If you eventually find it lacks any relevance or connection to your own life, then you may want to consider doing some self reflection and self exploration. But only do so if you feel it is necessary and even more importantly, when you feel ready.
  • Don’t be afraid to take a step out of your comfort zone. As the Scottish Philosopher David Hume cynically points out in An Enquiry of Human Understanding, those with religious belief tend to surround themselves with images, rituals, symbols, and figurines in order to sustain their faith. Although there is most certainly an anti-Catholic bias that shades his observation, Hume’s logic is not without merit and can certainly be extended beyond the God fearing. After all, those that associate themselves to some ‘-ism’ or another, be it spiritual or worldly, tend to be surrounded by literature, objects, symbols, customs, audio-visuals, and people that reinforces their belief in a chosen creed or lifestyle. It is very easy to get conditioned to a way of thinking or living that has almost become nearly habit. However, if you find that it is not useful to your life, don’t be afraid to expose yourself to a great big world full of new experiences. They can just as much reinvigorate your old worldview as transform it.